Working with Dreams: Depth Psychology Techniques of Carl Gustav Jung and James Hillman

Working with Dreams: Depth Psychology Techniques of Carl Gustav Jung and James Hillman

Dream work is ancient, it’s long tradition evidenced in the temples of Asclepius in Greece where individuals went to be healed through their dreams. Dreams have been an important aspect of many spiritual traditions, and even Freud considered the study of dreams to be his most important work. There are many methods of dream analysis. When working with dreams, it can be helpful to intentionally assess them from various aspects, including mythical, archetypal, alchemical, and collective, and to pay attention to which resonate most strongly emotionally and elicit even a physical response in order to begin to understand what insights are being gifted through your unconscious.

In The Dream and the Underworld, archetypal psychologist and post-Jungian James Hillman prefers to allow the dream and dream symbols to remain what they are, and not to analyze and interpret them but to simply interact with them and see what comes about. However, Hillman’s method of seeing focuses far more on an artistic view than from a therapeutic or results-oriented standpoint. As such, when it comes to dreams and symbols, he stays with the process and activity itself instead of seeking an outcome or solution. He values the description over interpretation, the animating and making a thing come alive rather than suffocating it with a contrived explanation from outside the dream. He thrives on visiting the dream in its own realm of power, the underworld, and in honoring it by allowing it to be its own entity there instead of trying to make it come alive in our ordinary world of thinking.

Hillman’s goal, as was Jung’s, is to get ever closer to the characters and activity in the dream realm, but as opposed to Jung who then turned to amplification in order to find meaning and interpretation at the level of the waking ego, Hillman chooses not to bring the dream... (click here to read full post)

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Tags: depth psychology, dream analysis, dreams, dreamwork, hillman, jung, jungian


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Comment by Aleksandar Malecic on February 11, 2015 at 1:15pm

Back to the crime scene. Was Hillman a "Jungian thinker"? Who or what is a "thinker"?

Comment by Aleksandar Malecic on April 22, 2013 at 4:23am

Dreams and daydreaming in my case can be random and without symbols or unusual events, like a parallel everyday reality that actually doesn't exist. I suppose it's individual. I've been into role playing all my life. On the other hand, important moments in dreams and daydreaming (a diary can help) can indeed provide some useful insights (coming complete suddenly and "out of nowhere").


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